Home News Madrasas in Telangana Get A New Crop of Teachers

Madrasas in Telangana Get A New Crop of Teachers

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A total of 115 new madrasas have come up in the State during the short time span. Interestingly, Maulana Azad National Urdu University’s madrasa support training and learning programme had attracted just over 20 students indicating a large section of the community does not approve of modernisation project in traditional institutions.

Irfan Sheik is an under graduate degree holder in English Literature from Osmania University and has a Bachelor’s degree in Education (B Ed). Instead of opting for a government teacher’s post he is currently imparting education in a madrasa at Moghulpura, Hyderabad. And he is not just the only graduate teaching in traditional schools for religious education. Marking a growing trend in madrasa education, religious bodies have started employing teachers who have both traditional and formal education. About 30 per cent of teachers in madrasas in Telangana have formal educational qualifications including under graduate and post graduate degrees from State and Central Universities. The figure used to be just a handful 10 years ago, State Education Department authorities said.

Marked change

Interestingly, the marked change in the demography of teachers in madrasas started from 2005. “There was a project called modernisation of madrasas by which State syllabus education was being imparted along with religious teaching in madrasas. But we felt that it was better to get teachers who are qualified in both traditional and regular education to teach students.

When we did that we did not have to change the focus of studies in madrasas,” said Ajmal Haq former educator and current caretaker of Shalibanda. This change seems to have helped students. “I have drawn the attention of several students from who are interested in science and social sciences. There are students who are currently doing science projects in my class,” the 33-year-old Sheikh said.

Mixed approach

While he did not support introduction of formal education in madrasas he said that a mixed approach would help students. “The way forward is not to cut down the traditional spiritual and religious lessons to make way for regular education in government or private schools or colleges,” a convinced Mr. Sheikh said. The voluminous growth of such institutions in Telangana during the past five years is a testimony towards the success of this mode of teaching, experts said. “There has been a 12 per cent increase in the number of madrasas during the time. That is also because parents are sending children to qualified teachers who can give them holistic education,” said Ahmed Khan a former madrasa educator. A total of 115 new madrasas have come up in the State during the short time span. Interestingly, Maulana Azad National Urdu University’s madrasa support training and learning programme had attracted just over 20 students indicating a large section of the community does not approve of modernisation project in traditional institutions.

Most educators of madrasas are, however, those educated in traditional schools just like the students they teach.

By: Nikhila Henry

Courtesy: The Hindu

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